Sunday, October 24, 2010

"Eat, Pray, Love," Should you watch it!

Director Ryan Murphy’s Eat, Pray, Love (rated PG-13 for language and sexual references) was as I anticipated. While Julia Roberts’ laugh is infectious, James Franco’s lazy smile leaves you wondering what mischief he is hiding and Javier Bardem’s accent is enticing this movie left me discouraged.


We are invited to experience the true story of author Liz Gilbert’s (Julia Roberts) quest for self-discovery through Italy, India and Bali. The catalyst for this trip is Liz’s divorce. After a seven year relationship, and an affair with David Piccolo (James Franco), she simply can’t be married anymore. It’s too hard. He’s too unfocused. He’s just not into her. She’s bored. They’ve hit a lull and leaving is the only answer. Stephen (Billy Crudup), proclaims he doesn’t want a divorce. He intends to keep his vows. He wants to work it out. Liz doesn’t give him a choice.

With Stephen and David both gone Liz’s first stop is Italy, remaining for four months where she eats and enjoys life. Next we find Liz in India at a Hindu retreat where she prays for strength to forgive herself for leaving Stephen, finding peace through meditation and the worship of Hindu gods. Next she’s off to Bali revisiting a medicine man she met years before. With Bali comes love through Felipe (Javier Bardem) a Brazilian businessman.

While I enjoyed watching the scenery of these three countries, Julia Roberts’ performance was lacking leaving me bored in parts. I believe the movie is less about Liz “discovering” herself, but more about her justifying her actions in having an affair and divorcing her husband. I do not recommend this movie for any age group. I found Liz’s selfish quest to be exactly what our culture proclaims as truth, when in fact as Christians we are to die to self and lean on God’s grace to carry us. We don’t just give up and leave when the going gets tough. Liz was also quick to jump into bed with David and Felipe even while still married to Stephen or not yet being married to Felipe. Eat, Pray, Love eloquently pays homage to our culture’s “live for yourself” mantra, but left me feeling as if I had wasted my time and money...Stephanie Spurgetis

Movie Review Bio:
I have been asked to periodically provide movie reviews for The Raven. In the event that you read my opinions, I thought it pertinent to tell you who I am. My name is Stephanie Spurgetis. Bill Farley is my Uncle. I work full time as a Paralegal. I earned a Bachelors of Liberal Arts with an emphasis in English and Communications from Washington State University in 2005. In June of this year I earned a Paralegal certificate from the University of Washington. However, despite my temporary lapse in judgment, I still bleed crimson and grey.
I love movies. My favorite being The Sandlot followed closely by The Village. I love to watch them, quote them and dissect them. I love when they make me cry, laugh and cringe, but don’t love when they frighten me. I believe there to be an appropriate You’ve Got Mail quote for every aspect of life and am never one to resist anything done by Masterpiece Theater. I acutely feel the pain of love scorned by Margaret in North and South or Lizzy in Pride and Prejudice but empathize with Fran in Strictly Ballroom. I have an unhealthy love of Amanda Bynes and an even unhealthier love of Ashton Kutcher (please don’t hold it against me). I believe Stardust and Penelope have earned the right to be deemed creative and worthy of multiple viewings.
I am not, however, a book to movie purest. I have adopted E.W Eagan’s quote “Never judge a book by its movie” as my mantra.While some felt director and screenwriter Andrew Adamson too liberally changed C.S. Lewis’s original story in Prince Caspian I thoroughly enjoyed the movie despite Susan and Prince Caspian’s fling. While I loved the book The Power of One I cannot recommend the movie simply because I didn’t like it. However, despite not needing the movie to perfectly match the book, I prefer to read the book first.I have yet to view Sandra Bullock’s Oscar winning performance in The Blind Side because I have not had time to read the book. I have not seen My Sister’s Keeper due to waiting for a friend to finish the book so we can watch it together (I read the book years ago).
Despite this long diatribe on movies the only important thing you must know about me is that above all else I love Jesus. My opinions and reviews will hopefully stem from a Biblical worldview that is constantly being molded by Biblical truth.

5 comments:

  1. Steph, thanks so much for your opinion! Sounds like I won't mind missing this one too much!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Steph, Thanks for the review of Eat, Pray, Love. It confirmed what I already suspected about this movie. I can't believe the media build up it got. It sounds like an empty hedonistic pursuit of self. I'll stick to Edwards' and Piper's Christian hedonism, the only pursuit that satisfies. Aunt Judy
    PS loved your bio!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Steph, thanks for the movie review. It confirmed what I already suspected about this film. I can't believe the media build up it got. It sounds like an empty hedonistic pursuit of self. I'll stick to Edwards' and Piper's Christian hedonism, the only pursuit that satisfies. PS enjoyed your bio!

    ReplyDelete
  4. The link below is from Justin Taylor's blog. This particular post is called, "Piper on What Could Make the Gospel-Centered Movement Unravel."

    http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2010/11/09/piper-on-what-could-make-the-gospel-centered-movement-unravel/

    What do you think?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Dan. I listened to the Piper video. I would like to think that the disconnect in young, gospel-centered believers between their profession and everyday decisions is not quite as cavernous at GCF as in other places, but maybe I fool myself! I'm sure in our media-soaked world, there are disconnects everywhere you turn. Piper talks about the dangling connections, and yes, if some of those wires aren't soldered together so that the gospel informs everyday decisions, their witness for Christ will be anemic at best. But all of us have such dangling wires, and only God's grace can connect them in years of often slow and painful growth. I don't know when these disconnects weren't a problem...but perhaps the problem is much more magnified now, and "gospel-centered" on its way to become synonymous with "licentious" in this generation. Many Christians today don't have a firm grasp on the exclusivity of Christ and tend toward compromising inclusivity, so maybe that is the mindset influencing the "anything" goes choices of young Christians.

    ReplyDelete